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Rinse:10 – Marcus Nasty

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rinse_10.pngTracklistingFuzzy Logic feat. L.A. Cartier – Call MeLil Silva – DifferentIll Blu – RiderLil Silva – SeasonsMad One – HousegirlsDJ Algonquin – Get HappyLil Silva – Tribal LandEnrique Benetez feat. Mia Mendez – CookingCrazy Cousinz - Always Be My BabyFuzzy Logic – In The MorningLil Silva – UntitledAltered Natives – Rass OutNitro + Plague feat. Essence – Inside Pushing Up FlowersFunkystepz – BounceGeeneus – Yellowtail VIPRoska feat. Jamie George – Wonderful DayAgent X – TraumaRudimental feat. May – Sexy SexyMarc Ambiance – RaindancePerempay & Dee – Be Your GirlKris Baya – Heartbreaker (Ill Blu Remix)Lil Silva – Pulse X vs Funky FlexS-Tee feat. Sacha – Knocking At Your DoorScotty D & Nikki Slimting – The SoundLil Silva – SwissSweet Boy Candy – Caught UpJallapino – TurbulenceBass Boy feat. Cad – Hit The DancefloorFunkystepz – Touch On Me
In 2007 Supa D mixed the third Rinse CD and in doing so ushered in the primary statement of the funky era. The first mix to document London’s emerging new house hybrid, it introduced a warm sound ripe with potential and keen to please audiences bored of grime’s cold, masculine aggression and progression towards a dance-unfriendly, clash-fuelled concert-like format. Two years later Marcus NASTY presents the ninth volume and in doing so, documents the massive changes the sound has undergone. This potential has become a living, breathing, raving reality; a realisation of the scene’s collective creative possibilities spearheaded by Marcus NASTY, its flagship DJ.To fans of grime or house, Marcus NASTY needs little introduction. As head of A-list grime crew, N.A.S.T.Y. – whose members have included at various times Kano, Ghetts, D Double and Footsie (Newham Generals), Jammer and Terror Danjah – he established an infamous road reputation. Yet while grime was getting grimier and more MC-focused, as a DJ he watched the separate path, where UK garage DJs began playing old school UKG and US house.“Basically, when the grime scene died there was nothing for no one to do, everyone started playing old school garage and stuff,” he explains. “People were playing house but it was taking ages for everyone to get into it. I thought ‘hang on, this ain’t us, this aint our music,’ because we came from grime, jungle, garage. To go to house it was like: ‘whoah, this is a bit too, erm, soft.’”“So I started asking all the UK producers, ‘have you started to make house?’ and they said, ‘we have but it don’t sound like house.’ So I said ‘just send it to me, let me see what it sounds like and I’ll see where you’re going wrong.’ So they sent me all their stuff and bit by bit I started playing it all and I ain’t looked back since.”In the time between Supa D and Marcus NASTY’s CD, funky has become the natural successor to UK garage (golden era: ’96-01), and blossomed into a diverse and vibrant scene. While house’s 4×4 pulse underpins most of the sound, over the top are a refreshingly broad selections of styles: US house and electro inspired diva vocal, dancehall-influenced ‘skank’ vocals, grime lyrics, dubbed out tracky flavours and Afro-inspired broken beat rhythms. Look deep enough and you’ll even hear the rumble of dubstep-influenced basslines.Marcus, as the scenes leading DJ, plays much of this spectrum. His vision is of a sound that has a house base but has influences from grime, jungle and garage. “All the influences that were there before and that’s what makes our sound, our sound,” he insists. “That’s why it will grow and we’ll be able to play our music in other countries. All those other [uK] DJs who think they’re gonna get somewhere playing house or minimal-tech, they’re not going to get no where.”Marcus NASTY has certainly got somewhere, DJing in the British holiday resorts of Ayia Napa and Malia as well as Gambia, Berlin and Northern Cyprus. Dubai and Toronto beckon, and as his air miles stack up, so roll back the boundaries of funky. Much of the scale of his international success is in many ways attributable to the reach of Rinse and the vigour with which he throws himself into his shows. “When you get people from all over the world just sending you messages about your show while you’re on there live: it’s big. I love it. [being on] Rinse is a big difference. Their station sounds different to other stations. Rinse have had this… sound, for years! … Compared to other stations it sounds different.”Just as he did with proto-funky, with joining Rinse Marcus NASTY saw an opportunity and took it. He took his place on the schedule amongst a-list DJs and made his mark by making his show exclusive and distinctive. “I actually love it, I can’t get enough. I try and go on Rinse as much as possible. I ring management at 8 a.m. every morning ‘is there a show? Is there a show? Is anyone not turning up?’ I ring them 3 in the morning ‘is there show, can I go on?’ I just love DJing.” If the scene continues to be this hungry, creative and inspirational, then the funky phenomenon has only just begun.Martin ClarkLDN, Autumn 2009
http://rinse.fm/index.php/music/rinse_10
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Im sure its November 2nd

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Personally wasn't feeling it.Too many bait tunes, which is a shame cos his selection is normally on point.No better than any of the free mix cd's floating around.

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aint listened yet, but just looks like another funky cd... which are quite boring now...

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