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Black Hair Timeline

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Hair Styles Of The African Diaspora: 1700-2003 The issue of hairstyle is a sensitive one amongst men and women of the African Diaspora. Hairstyle has been both a symbol of oppression and resistance, and a mark of freedom and individuality. The politics of Black hair dates back to the 1700s, when the tightly curled hair of slaves was seen as a mark of difference by non-whites, most notably as an emblem of the slaves' inferiority. From the early nineteenth century, hair straightening was advocated as an essential part of the former slaves' reconstruction as free people. In the second half of the twentieth century, the decision to opt for either a relaxed or a natural hairstyle has led to friction within the African diaspora, symbolising as it does an individual's personal definition of what Black identity means for them.Slavery and Colonialism shim.gifAB01.jpgshim.gifshim.gif A positive image, that challenges the ideology that natural hair of Black people is inferior and unattractive, can be seen in the refined hairstyling of a young Black women as featured in this Edwardian studio portrait. catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) AB01 Between 1898 and 1914, the Cheshire based company Lever Brothers Limited produced a loose-leaf colour advertisement for Lux soap, which featured a large Black woman wearing a red head scarf which covered all her hair. She is pouring Lux soap over the hair of a Black boy sitting in a tub. His hair is covered by a mound of white suds. The caption on the front of the advertisement reads 'Won't shrink wool'. On the back of the card, Lever Brothers claim that Lux is equally good for washing woollen clothes and hair. In the photograph on you left you can see how her natural hair compliments the elegant clothing of the period, lending this unnamed woman an appearance of gentility and demure femininity, terms generally applied only to her white female contemporaries who, historically, have been held up as the standard of beauty for all women in the Western World. The reference in the advertisements to the hair of Black people as 'wool' was a derogatory term dating back to the eighteenth century and to the enslavement of Black people. In 1774 Edward Long described Black people in his book The History of Jamaica :

'The Negroes use their heads, instead of their shoulders, or backs, for carrying all sorts of burdens; with a dried plantain leaf they plait a circular pad, which they call a cotta; upon this, the load rests, and preserves their wool from being rubbed off'

During the periods of slavery and colonialism, non-Blacks maintained that the hair of Black people was more difficult to groom than the hair of non-Blacks, and therefore less attractive. Good Grooming and Reconstruction shim.gifMH01.jpgshim.gifshim.gif It could be also be said that the restructuring of Black hair in order to create fashionable hairstyles such as the Eton Crop, a version of which was famously worn by the African-American performer Josephine Baker during the 1920s, was a forceful statement of Black identification with modernity. catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) MH01 shim.gifDC02.jpgshim.gifshim.gif The portraits of three Caribbean women, photographed at the Earnest Dyche Studios in Birmingham during the 1950s, illustrate the pursuit of good grooming practice for over a hundred years by different members of the African diaspora. Creating and maintaining good hairstyles became part of the psychological armour for Caribbeans settling in Britain. (Image originally supplied by Birmingham City Archives) catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) DC02 Despite this example of the styling possibilities for natural hair, the dominant practice amongst women and men from the 1830s onwards was the straightening of Black hair, with the aim to produce manageable hair for fashionable hairstyles. This was achieved through the use of creams (a process generally described as 'relaxing' the hair) or, from the late nineteenth century with a heated metal comb known as a 'pressing comb' (commonly known as 'straightening' or 'pressing' the hair). Applying one of these processes to the hair was advocated by such hairstyling specialists as the African-American, Madam C.J. Walker (1867-1919), who established her company, Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, in 1906. She has been credited with popularising the use of the pressing comb alongside her own product 'Madame C.J. Walker's Wonderful Hair Grower' or 'Vegetable Shampoo', as being part of good grooming practice. In 1952 Mrs. Beryl Gittens was advised by her uncle to 'walk with your pressing comb' as she planned her journey to Britain from Guyana. There was a severe lack of public hairdressing facilities for Black women and men during this period. Mrs Gittens, who trained as a hairdresser in Guyana from 1947 to 1950, remembers the difficulties this situation caused: 'there was no where you could have gone into to have your hair done in a white salon ... they could not even comb our hair. And they were so scared of it, they said "we can't do your hair" and often they never tried, and so I had people who used to come, you see the girls now cutting their hair off, that's just what they resorted to, just cut'. shim.gifCowley-2.jpgshim.gif A Black haircare shop in Oxford, 2003. To address such issues, and answer the pressing need, the Trinidadian pianist, Winifred Atwell established a salon in Brixton in the late 1950s to train English women how to style Black hair. But a more general solution was seen in the rise in the cottage industry of home Black hairstyling across the country, often by untrained individuals. From the late 1950s, hairdressing salons and courses specialising in Black hair began to be established, and flourished throughout the 1960s. In 1962, Mrs Gittens opened the first Black hairdressers on Streatham High Street, one of the first in London, Beryl's Hairdressing Salon whilst regularly attending refresher courses held by Black hair care professionals such as Roy Lando. Black Power, Black Consciousness, Black Identity: 1950s to the Present shim.gifDC01.jpgshim.gifshim.gif A Caribbean man in the 1950's with natural hair. (Image originally supplied by Birmingham City Archives) catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) DC01 The African-American Muslim and political leader, Malcolm X, viewed the straightening of hair amongst Black men, known as the conk, as a denial of their Black identity. In his book, The Autobiography of Malcolm X he described it as 'a step toward self-degradation ... I admire any Negro man who has never had himself conked, or who has had the sense to get rid of it - as I finally did' shim.gifLB02.jpgshim.gifshim.gif A young boy wearing his hair naturally in an afro. (Image originally supplied by Lambeth Council) catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) LB02 Black civil rights activists saw the chemical alteration of Black hair as an attempt to transform the Black body into a white body. This attitude led to the explosion of natural hairstyles such as braiding and cornrows. To have natural hair, despite the inferior connotations assigned to it in the past, has long been connected with self-pride for Black people. It was the preferred style amongst nineteenth century African-American and Black British intellectuals. In the 1950s, avant garde female musicians, including Nina Simone adopted the au naturel, the forerunner of the Afro. This natural halo-like hairstyle was worn throughout the African diaspora by men and women of all age groups during the 1960s and 1970s. It became part of the Civil Rights and Black Consciousness Movements, which dominated American politics and connected with other movements throughout the African diaspora. The Afro was equally appreciated as a Black fashion statement. shim.gifLB04.jpgshim.gifshim.gif A man with dreadlocks, a symbol of the Rastafarian religion. (Image originally supplied by Lambeth Council) catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) LB04The emergence of dreadlocks in Britain in the 1970s was part of the rise of the Rastafarian religion, which was established in Jamaica in the 1930s. The cultivation of natural hair into twisted strands was a meaningful aesthetic which connected wearers with their African heritage. Together, the Afro and dreadlocks were mechanisms available to reassure and remind Black people of their own self-worth. In the 21st century, the range of hairstyles created by Black women and men is incredible: it can be bleached blonde; relaxed and dyed into multi-colours; or the hair can be arranged into a bouffant of asymmetrical towering curls; wigs and hair extensions are used as casually as hair accessories. The Afro and dreadlocks are experiencing a renaissance. shim.gifDR01.jpgshim.gifshim.gif A cross between an afro and dreadlocks, one of many new Black hairstyles. (Image originally supplied by Victoria & Albert Muesum) catreficon.gif Moving Here catalogue reference (BCA) DR01 Yet despite the long history of Black hairstyles and their resistance to the denigration of a Black identity, the decisions Black men and women make about their hairstyles can still cause consternation. For example, to wear hair extensions can be read as a sign of fraudulence and disrespect to one's authentic Black identity; and to wear dreadlocks despite the ubiquitous presence and honourable religious beliefs of Rastafarianism, can still ignite family feuds. What is evident is that, regardless of how hairstyles are created, they all contribute to Black aesthetics and to the different ways in which Black people can be modern. <br clear="all">Creators: Carol Tulloch

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how you gonna have a topic about hair.3.jpg4.jpg

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interesting topicruined by idiots
C/SEven though I did 'lol' at Wavesurfer's postStill, C/S
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these whites are ruining our topics

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very good readwish the pics were bigger an moar pics

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i beg som1 post the pic wit that yute who has a f*ckED shape-upwhere its going behind his ears n sh*t

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i beg som1 post the pic wit that yute who has a f*ckED shape-upwhere its going behind his ears n sh*t
n514093254_829960_1383.jpg
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think he's talking about the guy who got grazed on the side of his head by a flash kick

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cool readmy mum use wear those 22 inch weaves in the early 90'speople used to call her Patralol @ when my pops used to have the fat afro with the side parting shaved in toooh how they evolve

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here is 1 of my grandad (bless his soul)image027orp.jpgnappy roots from day yh i know, bussing sunglasses in the yard whilst reading a newspaper, dont ask badman questions :lol:

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i beg som1 post the pic wit that yute who has a f*ckED shape-upwhere its going behind his ears n sh*t
n514093254_829960_1383.jpg
nah im nt talking bout lahii mean the pic where the guy is gettin forced 2 take the pic, some guy is grabbin his face nd sh*tnd i think the guy is in a st Josephs uniform
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The hair-cuts during the New Jack era days >>> _______________________

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i beg som1 post the pic wit that yute who has a f*ckED shape-upwhere its going behind his ears n sh*t
n514093254_829960_1383.jpg
nah im nt talking bout lahii mean the pic where the guy is gettin forced 2 take the pic, some guy is grabbin his face nd sh*tnd i think the guy is in a st Josephs uniform
yeh it was from the 'slippin' thread.
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interesting topic

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The hair-cuts during the New Jack era days >>> _______________________
bobby-brown-1992.jpg
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17360_386757280079_740510079_10322645_4534237_n.jpg#saysomethingBorn in the 80's, raised in the 90's...
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lmao @ not lahidone every hairstyle its not a thing.

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You leave Snoop out of this
lol just clocked that
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