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STRIPEZ

Hang tight the caribbeans who look down on Africa

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Similarity to Caribbean dialects

Nigerian Pidgin, along with the various pidgin and creole languages of West Africa, displays a remarkable similarity to the various dialects of English found in the Caribbean. Linguists hypothesize that this stems from the fact that the majority of slaves taken to the New World were of West African origin, and many words and phrases in Nigerian Pidgin can be found in Jamaican Creole (also known as Jamaican Patois or simply Patois) and the other creole languages of the West Indies. The pronunciation and accents often differ a great deal, mainly due to the extremely heterogeneous mix of African languages present in the West Indies, but if written on paper or spoken slowly, the creole languages of West Africa are for the most part mutually intelligible with the creole languages of the Caribbean. The presence of repetitious phrases in Jamaican Creole such as "su-su" (gossip) and "pyaa-pyaa" (sickly) mirror the presence of such phrases in West African languages such as "bam-bam", which means "complete" in the Yoruba language. Repetitious phrases are also present in Nigerian Pidgin, such as, "koro-koro", meaning "clear vision", "yama-yama", meaning "disgusting", and "dorti-dorti", meaning "garbage". Furthermore, the use of the words of West African origin in Jamaican Patois, such as "boasie" (meaning proud, a word that comes from the Yoruba word "bosi" also meaning "proud") and "Unu" - Jamaican Patois or "Una" - West African Pidgin (meaning "you people", a word that comes from the Igbo word "unu" also meaning "you people") display some of the interesting similarities between the English pidgins and creoles of West Africa and the English pidgins and creoles of the West Indies, as does the presence of words and phrases that are identical in the languages on both sides of the Atlantic, such as "Me a go tell dem" (I'm going to tell them) and "make we" (let us). Use of the word "deh" or "dey" is found in both Jamaican Patois and Nigerian Pidgin English, and is used in place of the English word "is" or "are". The phrase "We dey foh London" would be understood by both a speaker of Patois and a speaker of Nigerian Pidgin to mean "We are in London". Other similarities, such as "pikin" (Nigerian Pidgin for "child") and "pikney" (or "pikiny"--Jamaican Patois for "child") and "chook" (Nigerian Pidgin for "poke" or "stab") which corresponds with the Jamaican Patois word "jook" further demonstrate the linguistic relationship.

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noticed this soon as i started talkin to these fob nigerians at uni

love it

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I've actually encountered more Nigerians looking down on Caribbeans. TBH..

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lets not perpetuate the madness, today is a deeper day

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Africans look down on us, we laugh at Africans.

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that's it, fight amongst yourselves

mrburns.gif

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that's it, fight amongst yourselves

mrburns.gif

lol 1vs1 cage match MW2 later.

snm

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Interestin Read....

Where you find this article from?

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that's it, fight amongst yourselves

mrburns.gif

LMFAO

Edit

Ahh no

I meant to rep you but I negged you by accident

sorry brah

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lol

thats what im sayin

who called u african

who called u caribbean

nonsense foolish rubbish

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The title perhaps but the rest isn't

Its known though, a lot of the time when you hear people speak in a SA or general african dialect it sounds like patois

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its all just niggas tryna speak h'inglish imo

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doesn't explain why the fobs gravitate to jamaican and even more puzzling, yankeedom.

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doesn't explain why the fobs gravitate to jamaican and even more puzzling, yankeedom.

everyone gravitates toward jamaican and american culture

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A lot of blacks do that anyway though, but thats another matter.

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but FUBU? i mean it's garish.

americans don't even wear fubu.

russell simmons doesn't even wear fubu.

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good read, but dont understand the relevance to the title tho

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Really and truelly who gives a sh*t

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too many yard man are picking up american antics

like a disrespectful culture has infiltrated the islands, mostly through tv

i remember watching episodes of sunset beach and seeing them come out here 3 years later on ch5

its probs the same in africa, u got like 300 chnls on cable/sattelite and 10 will be home networks, the rest imported

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Its not a yard man ting its a black people ting

has f*ckED UP the youth of this country fully

Im aware I say this about 50 times a year aswell

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good read, but dont understand the relevance to the title tho

wouldn't have got the attention its gettin now.

controversy sells.

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