Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Captain Planet

The Weird and Strange Thread

309 posts in this topic

The Bermuda Triangle (also known as Devil's Triangle and Devil's Sea) is a nearly half-million square-mile (1.2 million km2) area of ocean roughly defined by Bermuda, Puerto Rico, and the southernmost tip of Florida. This area is noted for

a high incidence of unexplained losses of ships, small boats, and aircraft..

bmd_trg2.jpg

Click to view larger image

The Bermuda Triangle has become popular through representation by the mass media, in which it is a paranormal site in which the known laws of physics are either violated, altered, or both.

While there is a common belief that a number of ships and airplanes have disappeared under highly unusual circumstances in this region, the United States Coast Guard and others disagree with that assessment, citing statistics demonstrating that the number of incidents involving lost ships and aircraft is no larger than that of any other heavily traveled region of the world.

bmd_trg1.jpg

Click to enlarge this image

There is a common belief that a number of ships and airplanes have disappeared under highly unusual circumstances in the region called

Bermuda Triangle. Over 100 airplane disappearances and over

1000 lives lost since 1945

Many of the alleged mysteries have proven not so mysterious or unusual upon close examination, with inaccuracies and misinformation about the cases often circulating and recirculating over the decades.

The triangle is an arbitrary shape, crudely marking out a corridor of the Atlantic, stretching northward from the West Indies, along the North American seaboard, as far as the Carolinas. In the Age of Sail, ships returning to Europe from parts south would sail north to the Carolinas, then turn east for Europe, taking advantage of the prevailing wind direction across the North Atlantic. Even with the development of steam and internal-combustion engines, a great deal more shipping traffic was (and still is) found nearer the US coastline than towards the empty centre of the Atlantic. The Triangle also loosely conforms with the course of the Gulf Stream as it leaves the West Indies, and has always been an area of volatile weather. The combination of distinctly heavy maritime traffic and tempestuous weather meant that a certain, also distinctly large, number of vessels would flounder in storms.

Given the historical limitations of communications technology, most of those ships that sank without survivors would disappear without a trace. The advent of wireless communications, radar, and satellite navigation meant that the unexplained disappearances largely ceased at some point in the 20th Century. The occasional vessel still sinks, but rarely without a trace. It should be noted that both the concept and the name of the Bermuda Triangle date only to the 1960s, and were the products of an American journalist.

Other areas often purported to possess unusual characteristics are the Devil's Sea, located near Japan, and the Marysburgh Vortex or the Great Lakes Triangle, located in eastern Lake Ontario.

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bermuda_Triangle

Bermuda (or "Devil's") Triangle

The Bermuda Triangle (a.k.a. the Devil's Triangle) is a triangular area in the Atlantic Ocean bounded roughly at its points by Miami, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico. Legend has it that many people, ships and planes have mysteriously vanished in this area. How many have mysteriously disappeared depends on who is doing the locating and the counting. The size of the triangle varies from 500,000 square miles to three times that size, depending on the imagination of the author. (Some include the Azores, the Gulf of Mexico, and the West Indies in the "triangle.") Some trace the mystery back to the time of Columbus. Even so, estimates range from about 200 to no more than 1,000 incidents in the past 500 years. Howard Rosenberg claims that in 1973 the U.S. Coast Guard answered more than 8,000 distress calls in the area and that more than 50 ships and 20 planes have gone down in the Bermuda Triangle within the last century.

Many theories have been given to explain the extraordinary mystery of these missing ships and planes. Evil extraterrestrials, residue crystals from Atlantis, evil humans with anti-gravity devices or other weird technologies, and vile vortices from the fourth dimension are favorites among fantasy writers. Strange magnetic fields and oceanic flatulence (methane gas from the bottom of the ocean) are favorites among the technically-minded. Weather (thunderstorms, hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, high waves, currents, etc.) bad luck, pirates, explosive cargoes, incompetent navigators, and other natural and human causes are favorites among skeptical investigators.

There are some skeptics who argue that the facts do not support the legend, that there is no mystery to be solved, and nothing that needs explaining.The number of wrecks in this area is not extraordinary, given its size, location and the amount of traffic it receives. Many of the ships and planes that have been identified as having disappeared mysteriously in the Bermuda Triangle were not in the Bermuda Triangle at all. Investigations to date have not produced scientific evidence of any unusual phenomena involved in the disappearances. Thus, any explanation, including so-called scientific ones in terms of methane gas being released from the ocean floor, magnetic disturbances, etc., are not needed. The real mystery is how the Bermuda Triangle became a mystery at all.

The modern legend of the Bermuda Triangle began soon after five Navy planes [Flight 19] vanished on a training mission during a severe storm in 1945. The most logical theory as to why they vanished is that lead pilot Lt. Charles Taylor’s compass failed. The trainees' planes were not equipped with working navigational instruments. The group was disoriented and simply, though tragically, ran out of fuel. No mysterious forces were likely to have been involved other than the mysterious force of gravity on planes with no fuel. It is true that one of the rescue planes blew up shortly after take-off, but this was likely due to a faulty gas tank rather than to any mysterious forces.

Over the years there have been dozens of articles, books, and television programs promoting the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle. In his study of this material, Larry Kushe found that few did any investigation into the mystery. Rather, they passed on the speculations of their predecessors as if they were passing on the mantle of truth. Of the many uncritical accounts of the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle, perhaps no one has done more to create this myth than Charles Berlitz, who had a bestseller on the subject in 1974. After examining the 400+ page official report of the Navy Board of Investigation of the disappearance of the Navy planes in 1945, Kushe found that the Board wasn't baffled at all by the incident and did not mention alleged radio transmissions cited by Berlitz in his book. According to Kushe, what isn't misinterpreted by Berlitz is fabricated. Kushe writes: "If Berlitz were to report that a boat were red, the chance of it being some other color is almost a certainty." (Berlitz, by the way, did not invent the name; that was done by Vincent Gaddis in "The Deadly Bermuda Triangle," which appeared in the February, 1964, issue of Argosy, a magazine devoted to fiction.)

In short, the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle became a mystery by a kind of communal reinforcement among uncritical authors and a willing mass media to uncritically pass on the speculation that something mysterious is going on in the Atlantic.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pos. good thread i hope it does well.

an interesting thread on here for once

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good topic pal, that bermuda triangle is sum f*cked up sh*t u know

who believes in reptilians n illuminati n that on eya then?

-4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

allow turning it into that kinda thread

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is, go ahead man.

-3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do you ever think, that when lookin for aliens we just aint doing it right?

like what if because theyre from somewhere else they operate on a frequency we cant hear and on a spectrum we can see or detect?

like what if they are all around us, but we just dont know because we dont have a way to see or hear them

whenever im bored i always think of sh*t like this

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

plus

wikipedia >>>>____

ive been on there for the past hour i swear u click one thing then theres sutin else u wanna see so u click that, then sutin else etc etc man could be there all day

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

plus

wikipedia >>>>____

ive been on there for the past hour i swear u click one thing then theres sutin else u wanna see so u click that, then sutin else etc etc man could be there all day

i swear one time i was looking at some boring sh*t about electrics for uni, and within a few clicks i found myself reading about Yetis, f*ck knows how i managed that.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Disappearance of Charlie Chalks Eyebrows

Where did they go? Iluminati? CIA?

Maybe we'll never know.

God I hate that c*nt.

8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do you ever think, that when lookin for aliens we just aint doing it right?

like what if because theyre from somewhere else they operate on a frequency we cant hear and on a spectrum we can see or detect?

like what if they are all around us, but we just dont know because we dont have a way to see or hear them

whenever im bored i always think of sh*t like this

there are definately means of detecting all frequencies of sound and light/EM radiation, so if their are intelligent life forms communicating in the traditional method of "waves" then we definately have the technology to detect them. whether its in use is another question, altho im pretty sure they are detecting across all possibilities.

i think the idea of being completely "unable" to detect them is something that falls into the realm of "extra-overlapping dimensions" and stuff which is more science-fiction/educated guessing then actual science.

but the idea of not being able to detect them in the conventional sense is definately false.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

allow turning it into that kinda thread

ye this is good thread, please...

NO REPTILIAN SHITE HERE

the idea is just completely illogical and seems only to be there as a persuasive concept simply to feed the minds of those who are LOOKING for some kind of controversal and extraordinary explanations. strange for the sake of it.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do you ever think, that when lookin for aliens we just aint doing it right?

like what if because theyre from somewhere else they operate on a frequency we cant hear and on a spectrum we can see or detect?

like what if they are all around us, but we just dont know because we dont have a way to see or hear them

whenever im bored i always think of sh*t like this

there are definately means of detecting all frequencies of sound and light/EM radiation, so if their are intelligent life forms communicating in the traditional method of "waves" then we definately have the technology to detect them. whether its in use is another question, altho im pretty sure they are detecting across all possibilities.

i think the idea of being completely "unable" to detect them is something that falls into the realm of "extra-overlapping dimensions" and stuff which is more science-fiction/educated guessing then actual science.

but the idea of not being able to detect them in the conventional sense is definately false.

boy

we might not even have detected the entire light spectrum

we ain't as clever as we like to think

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what if because theyre from somewhere else they operate on a frequency we cant hear and on a spectrum we can see or detect?

like what if they are all around us, but we just dont know because we dont have a way to see or hear them

yes mate, they are called demons. TTKK

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PURE MADNESS:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_Pass_incident

The Dyatlov Pass incident refers to an event that resulted in the deaths of nine ski hikers in the northern Ural mountains on the night of February 2, 1959. It happened on the east shoulder of the mountain Kholat Syakhl (Холат Сяхл) (a Mansi name, meaning Mountain of the Dead). The mountain pass where the incident occurred has since been named Dyatlov Pass (Перевал Дятлова) after the group's leader, Igor Dyatlov (Игорь Дятлов).

The lack of eyewitnesses and subsequent investigations into the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigators at the time determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow. Though the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] According to sources, four of the victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation. There is no mention of this in contemporary documentation; it only appears in later documents.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths. Access to the area was barred for three years after the incident.[1] The chronology of the incident remains unclear due to the lack of survivors.[2][3]

Similar vein to the Bermuda triangle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valentich_disappearance

The Valentich disappearance describes an event on 21 October 1978 when 20-year-old Frederick Valentich disappeared in unknown circumstances while piloting a Cessna 182L light aircraft over Bass Strait to King Island, Australia.

During a 127 mile (235 km) training flight, Valentich advised Melbourne air traffic control he was being accompanied by an aircraft about 1,000 feet (300 m) above him.[2] He described unusual actions and features of the aircraft, reported that his engine had begun running roughly, and finally reported before disappearing from radar that "That strange aircraft is hovering on top of me again. It is hovering and it's not an aircraft".[2]

No trace of Valentich or his aircraft was ever found, and a Department of Transport investigation concluded that the reason for the disappearance could not be determined.[1]

This one's not paranormal or whatever, but it is a cool/weird story:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._B._Cooper

D. B. Cooper is the name attributed to a man who hijacked a Boeing 727 aircraft in the United States on November 24, 1971, received US$200,000[1] in ransom, and parachuted from the plane. The name he used to board the plane was Dan Cooper, but through a later press miscommunication, he became known as "D. B. Cooper". Despite hundreds of leads through the years, no conclusive evidence has ever surfaced regarding Cooper's true identity or whereabouts, and the bulk of the money has never been recovered. Several theories offer competing explanations of what happened after his famed jump, but the FBI believes he did not survive.[2]

The nature of Cooper's escape and the uncertainty of his fate continue to intrigue people. The Cooper case (code-named "Norjak" by the FBI)[3] is the only unsolved U.S. aircraft hijacking,[4] and one of the few such cases anywhere in the world, along with Malaysia Airlines Flight 653.

The Cooper case has baffled government and private investigators for decades, with countless leads turning into dead ends. As late as March 2008, the FBI thought it might have had a breakthrough when children unearthed a parachute within the bounds of Cooper's probable jump site near the town of Amboy, Washington.[5] Experts later determined that it did not belong to the hijacker.

Despite the case's enduring lack of evidence, a few significant clues have arisen. In late 1978 a placard containing instructions on how to lower the aft stairs of a 727, later confirmed to be from the rear stairway of the plane from which Cooper jumped, was found just a few flying minutes north of Cooper's projected drop zone. In February 1980 on the banks of the Columbia River, eight-year-old Brian Ingram found $5,880 in decaying $20 bills, which proved to be part of the original ransom.[6]

In October 2007, the FBI claimed that it had obtained a partial DNA profile of Cooper from the tie he left on the hijacked plane.[7] On December 31, 2007, the FBI revived the unclosed case by publishing never-before-seen composite sketches and fact sheets online in an attempt to trigger memories that could possibly identify Cooper. In a press release, the FBI reiterated that it does not believe Cooper survived the jump, but expressed an interest in ascertaining his identity.[7][8]

Will come back with more, I like this kinda sh*t.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do you ever think, that when lookin for aliens we just aint doing it right?

like what if because theyre from somewhere else they operate on a frequency we cant hear and on a spectrum we can see or detect?

like what if they are all around us, but we just dont know because we dont have a way to see or hear them

whenever im bored i always think of sh*t like this

dunno y this got pos'd cos LOL at thinkin they havent done it right. they know where they are and probably communicate with them

via their magical juju powers init.

na it got pos'd cos its true humans dont know everything

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PURE MADNESS:

http://en.wikipedia....v_Pass_incident

The Dyatlov Pass incident refers to an event that resulted in the deaths of nine ski hikers in the northern Ural mountains on the night of February 2, 1959. It happened on the east shoulder of the mountain Kholat Syakhl (Холат Сяхл) (a Mansi name, meaning Mountain of the Dead). The mountain pass where the incident occurred has since been named Dyatlov Pass (Перевал Дятлова) after the group's leader, Igor Dyatlov (Игорь Дятлов).

The lack of eyewitnesses and subsequent investigations into the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigators at the time determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow. Though the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] According to sources, four of the victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation. There is no mention of this in contemporary documentation; it only appears in later documents.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths. Access to the area was barred for three years after the incident.[1] The chronology of the incident remains unclear due to the lack of survivors.[2][3]

That is some messed up sh*t

Leaves room for lots of theories

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0