Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Corrigan

MY HERO HAS RETIRED

8 posts in this topic

Ricky Hatton – The Hitman’s Boxing Legacy: Thoughts from the brainby Martin 'The Brain' Potter of the Boxing Clever podcast - In news reports today it appears that one of Britain’s most popular ever fighters, Ricky ‘The Hitman’ Hatton, has finally acknowledged that he will never again lace up gloves and step inside the squared circle as a professional combatant. Although greatly loved by fans for his character as well as his in-ring exploits, a quick trawl through Eastside Boxing’s past articles and blogs reveals that ‘The Hitman’ is seen as anything from one of the finest fighters to ever emerge from the UK to an overrated, glorified club fighter. Now he has finally ‘hung ‘em up’, I attempt to analyse the reality of Ricky’s achievements.Firstly I would like to categorically debunk the much perpetrated myth (mainly by Americans, sorry to say) that Hatton was a glorified pub brawler who would have sunk without trace had he been brought up on the other side of the pond (although given his current size, if you dropped him in the water now he probably would sink without trace…). Anyone who views Hatton as a ‘club fighter’, in my opinion, knows nothing about boxing. Why? Let’s start by looking at Hatton’s record and achievements in the ring. Ricky took his first major world title when he scalped Kostya Tszyu, a man ranked by many as one of the top five pound for pound fighters in the world at the time and a legend in his adopted homeland of Australia. Club fighters don’t beat legends. Even if Hatton had achieved nothing more after the Tszyu fight, he wouldn’t deserve the derisory ‘club fighter’ tag.Yet Hatton did achieve more, winning another world title in his next fight (against Carlos Maussa) and also taking the ring magazine belt and fighter of the year awards. The Hitman, eager to test himself further, then went to the States, where many claimed he would flounder, and beat a well schooled tricky American – Luis Collazo – in a higher weight division to become a two weight world champion. Although not a convincing win by any means, Hatton dug deep, showed his mettle and ground out the victory, his resilience and determination in a tough fight a demonstration of what separates champions from mere contenders.Moving back down to light-welter, Hatton defeated another reigning world champion, Juan Urango, to win his fourth world belt in four fights and then he took out Mexican tough guy Jose Luis Castillo with a picture perfect body shot. That win set up the ‘undefeated’ showdown with pound for pound king Floyd Mayweather and even as an ardent Hatton fan, I acknowledge he was simply out of his depth and outclassed by ‘Money’. But almost every fighter Floyd faces finds themselves in that position and Ricky Hatton deserves credit for again stepping up in weight and fighting in Floyd’s back yard. Pretty meaningless comeback wins followed for Ricky before he was separated from his senses by the mighty Manny Pacquiao, but Ricky as a fighter should be remembered for his run of world title wins, as opposed to defeats by the two greatest fighters of his generation.Ricky Hatton did have his faults as a fighter without a doubt (which boxer doesn’t?), grappling too much later in his career, neglecting his boxing skills and having a tendency to use somewhat dubious tactics. Yet Hatton at his best was an excellent pressure fighter with an indomitable will to win, quicker hands that many think and much under appreciated boxing skills (check out the Ben Tackie fight). You don’t beat a succession of reigning, future or former world champions if you are the chump that many wrongly claim Ricky to be.In summary I wouldn’t claim that Hatton was the greatest fighter ever to come from the UK, or even the best fighter from these shores in recent years – Calzaghe, Lewis and Prince Naseem Hamed would all rank above Ricky in my opinion – but he was a very good fighter, a worthy world champion and a great asset to the sport of boxing. If you still doubt Ricky’s ability, take a look at the current crop of light-welterweights, then watch Hatton at his peak and ask yourself this; could Khan, Bradley or Maidana really beat the ‘glorified club fighter’ that took out Kostya Tzyu? Thought not.
Ricky Hatton - Finally “Man Enough” To Admit He’s RetiredBy James Slater: Just short of two full years on from his brutal and painful loss to Manny Pacquiao, British megastar and former two-weight world ruler Ricky Hatton has finally been able to announce he will never fight again. Since the loss to Pac-Man, just the second pro defeat of the 32-year-old’s career, there has been almost constant speculation as to whether of not the light-welterweight sensation will box again - maybe in a “farewell” fight. But now, from “The Hitman” himself, comes confirmation that this will not be the case.“I wake up every morning and still miss it,” Hatton told The Mirror. “But the one good thing I do have is something between my ears despite all the hard fights. If the fire isn’t burning to get up and run and then spar and make the other sacrifices, then I’ve got to call it a day. After the Pacquiao fight I was sulking, depressed and drowning my sorrows. Depression and a few pints is definitely not a good mixture.“I haven’t coped well with retiring, but you have to hit rock bottom before you get back into gear - which is what I’ve done. It still breaks my heart to think I won’t fight again, but at least I’m man enough to admit it now.”Now enjoying his time as a successful promoter, Hatton has seemingly beaten the demons that attacked him shortly after the crushing 2nd-round loss to Pac-Man. After a well-publicised stay in rehab that came after he fell into a seriously-spiralling drink and drugs binge, Hatton is now “in a good place” and, as he says, “man enough” to admit his fighting days are over.It’s surely a tough thing for any former world champion to turn down big-money offers to fight again (offers Hatton has certainly had), and Hatton must be applauded for not attempting to recapture past glories when he knows he would not be able to. Hatton, always a fan-favourite, will not cheat his loyal followers with a failure of a comeback.It is to be hoped Ricky has a long and happy retirement. Hatton leaves the rough side of the ropes with a fine 45-2(32) record.Among Hatton’s career highlights are:A June 2005 11th-round retirement win over the great Kostya Tszyu.Receiving Ring Magazine’s FOTY award for 2005.A successful May 2006 move up to welterweight, with a WBA title win over Luis Collazo: WU12.A June 2007, one-punch KO win over Mexican legend Jose Luis Castillo.Five amazing headlining nights in Las Vegas!Thanks for the memories, Ricky!
CRACKING GEAZER, TRUE GENT OF THE SPORT, ONE OF THE LADS, HAVE A LINE OF BUGLE BEFORE TRAINING AND GO DOWN THE PUB FOR A QUICK 10PINTS AFTER, f*ck*ng LEDGETHERE'S ONLY ONE RICKY HATTON!!!!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wikid Kostya Tzyu... got put in the boxing hall of fame this year

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah him & Tyson./Used to love watching Hatton. The Castillo KO >>

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's a nice guy.His discipline was extremely poor, could have made something more of himself if he didn't get pissed, do coke, and blow up to 13 stone inbetween fights.Shame, that.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well he is making a come back in November

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it confirmed? There's been a lot of talk about a malignaggi rematch, and a fight with Khan.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

age wise i think he could do something, However i can imagine what his diet and lifestyle has been like since retirement,

based on that i don't want to see him in the ring, guess the bug is hard to shake.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0