Toney Barton

What is beauty

30 posts in this topic

to you?

Written by English composer Thomas Tallis 500 years ago.

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Beauty is a woman who doesn't need copious amounts of makeup to recreate her face.

Also the simple act of watching the sun come up in the morning.

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder tbh

For example some man c any lighty n get stary eyed

Me I find dark skin African chicas the boomest . Over any Latino thick White girl or mixy or Asian

All of my bredrins even some family members question my choice of woman . But to me they r straight sexi

The stick I used to get from my doogz over this 1 ghanian ting I used to date was mad

Nuff tarmac comparisons but to me she was alot

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look outside

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder tbh

For example some man c any lighty n get stary eyed

Me I find dark skin African chicas the boomest . Over any Latino thick White girl or mixy or Asian

All of my bredrins even some family members question my choice of woman . But to me they r straight sexi

The stick I used to get from my doogz over this 1 ghanian ting I used to date was mad

Nuff tarmac comparisons but to me she was alot

I said what does it mean to you.

Those ain't bredrins if they will talk about your girl like that tbh.

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N I said is in the eye of the beholder

N nah we always take the piss out of wifeys especially wen man starts behaving p*ssy whipped

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396400_331588806884007_100000986705304_965458_544048310_n.jpg

This is so awesome. Please take a moment to read:

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

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One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

Another possible conclusion could be that people just don't appreciate Classical music, which is a tragedy.

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Or maybe certain people don't really care for classical music?

If it was drake rapping or CR7 doing football skills then more people may stop and take an interest as that's something they see as "beauty"

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