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Goddaz

*EAST LONDONERS ARE TOP BAREBACKERS*

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There are almost half a million more people living in England and Wales than official estimates suggested. The most likely reason for that under-counting is inaccurate migration data.

It is notable that the number of people in their 20s has risen from 6.6m to 7.6m - the additional one million people are most likely to be migrant workers.

The increase in the number of under-fives by 400,000 is also a consequence of immigration, but increasing fertility among British-born women is the key driver in pushing up the fertility rate.

Half of the total increase in population was in London, the South-East and East regions of England.

The Office for National Statistics says that about 55% of the population increase was the result of net migration.

The population projections published by the ONS will be revised upwards in the autumn.

The first figures from the 2011 census have been released and show there has been a huge increase in the population of England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The census - carried out in March last year - found there were 53 million people in England; 3.1 million in Wales; and 1.8 million in Northern Ireland.

It also revealed there were 33 times as many people over 90 as there were a century ago.

Here's a round up of what the first England and Wales data reveals. UK-wide census-based population estimates, including Scotland, will be released in December 2012.

More people

The population of England and Wales has risen by 3.7 million in a decade, up to 56.1 million, the census shows. It is the largest growth shown by any census since they began in 1801.

The growth was fuelled by increased life expectancy, a rise in fertility rates and migration, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

_61597057_census464x360.gif

Ageing population

The figures also indicate the population is ageing, with the median age rising to 39 in 2011 from 35 in 2001.

The percentage of the population aged 65 and over was the highest seen in any census at 16.4% - or one in six people.Continue reading the main story

Figures in detail

PDF downloadOffice for National Statistics: Census 2011[460 KB]

Most computers will open PDF documents automatically, but you may need Adobe Reader

The number of people over the age of 90 also went up. There were 430,000 residents within their ninth decade in 2011, compared with 340,000 in 2001 and 13,000 in 1911.

The census showed that higher percentages of people aged 65 and over lived along the coast of England, in the south west, south east and east.

Eastern European emigration

European population growth between 2001 and 2011 differed greatly between countries.

While some, such as Cyprus, Ireland, Luxembourg, Spain and England, saw big increases, others, mainly in eastern Europe, experienced population losses.

Latvia, Bulgaria, Lithuania, Romania, Hungary, Estonia, Germany and Poland all saw their populations decrease.

_61597063_census464x754.gif

Regional differences

Although all of the wider regions of England and Wales saw population growth in the last decade, within those regions some local authorities saw theirs decline.

The biggest population growth was seen in London's Tower Hamlets (up 26.4%) and Newham (up 23.5%), while Manchester showed the third highest growth - up 19%.

Overall, 10 of the 20 authorities with the highest percentage growth were in London. The 19 most densely populated authorities were also in London.

In contrast, almost half of the local authorities with a declining population were in north-west England, and a further four were in north-east England. The ONS suggested this could be, in part, down to the decline in traditional manufacturing industries in these areas.

England and Wales authorities: Top population rises

Council 2001 population 2011 population % change since 2001

1. Tower Hamlets, London

201,000

254,000

26.4

2. Newham, London

249,000

308,000

23.5

3. Manchester, north-west England

423,000

503,000

19.0

4. Hackney, London

207,000

246,000

18.9

5. Hounslow, London

216,000

254,000

17.6

6. Greenwich, London

218,000

255,000

17.1

7. Milton Keynes, south-east England

213,000

249,000

17.0

8. Leicester, east Midlands

283,000

330,000

16.7

9. Peterborough, east of England

157,000

184,000

16.6

10. Waltham Forest, London

222,000

258,000

16.3

England and Wales authorities: Top population losses

Council 2001 population 2011 population % change since 2001

NOTE: % CHANGE MAY NOT APPEAR CORRECT DUE TO ROUNDING. SOURCE: OFFICE FOR NATIONAL STATISTICS

-6

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England and Wales authorities: Top population rises

Council 2001 population 2011 population % change since 2001

1. Tower Hamlets, London 201,000 254,000 26.4

2. Newham, London 249,000 308,000 23.5

3. Manchester, north-west England 423,000 503,000 19.0

4. Hackney, London 207,000 246,000 18.9

5. Hounslow, London 216,000 254,000 17.6

6. Greenwich, London 218,000 255,000 17.1

7. Milton Keynes, south-east England 213,000 249,000 17.0

8. Leicester, east Midlands 283,000 330,000 16.7

9. Peterborough, east of England 157,000 184,000 16.6

10. Waltham Forest, London 222,000 258,000 16.3

England and Wales authorities: Top population losses

Council 2001 population 2011 population % change since 2001

NOTE: % CHANGE MAY NOT APPEAR CORRECT DUE TO ROUNDING. SOURCE: OFFICE FOR NATIONAL STATISTICS

1. Barrow-in-Furness, north-west England 72,000 69,000 -4.0

2. Knowsley, north-west England 151,000 146,000 -3.5

3. Sefton, north-west England 283,000 274,000 -3.2

4. Sunderland, north-east England 285,000 276,000 -3.2

5. Redcar and Cleveland, north-east England 139,000 135,000 -2.9

6. Burnley, north-west England 90,000 87,000 -2.8

7. Kensington and Chelsea, London 162,000 159,000 -2.2

8. Middlesbrough, north-east England 141,000 138,000 -2.0

9. West Somerset, south-west England 35,000 35,000 -1.1

10. Hyndburn, north-west England 82,000 81,000 -1.0

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Here's an interactive population growth map from the guardian.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/datablog/interactive/2012/jul/16/census-2011-uk-map-data

This massive increase in population has increased the number of households, which has made home ownership and renting even more expensive.

They need to get a f*ck*ng grip of this. Either restrict inbound migration or make it easier for people to buy land and build homes.

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FROM EAST LONDON WHERE THE MANDEM ARE BB

yeah it was shit, sue me

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wierd. me and my boy were discussing that chicks from east tend to be the most retarded/trusting/barebacky. this is some solid evidence.

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