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Afgoon

what does it take to become a footballer

107 posts in this topic

as a young man be it black or whit

is it all natural talent ?

is it pratice? and if so wat type of pratice... is it puerly hours or is it targeted pratice

is physicallity that important ?

how do you get spotted ? tournaments ? sunday leagues ? as a kid ?

what does a parent need to do to his kid mentality not talkin bacha bazi but how do u prepare them mentality ?

does he need a schoool edumakation ?

feel free to add anecdotes and methodology to training a good technical youth

also feel free to offer advice in terms of akick and run merchant or mixed race athlete/part time ballers

shoudl u identify what traits the youth has and focus on them?

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as a child, practise. practise mainly passing and ball control at a young age

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do whatever messi is doing not to get injured, injuries will f*ck you up

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Ability, which is either achieved or improved upon via thousands of hours of practice.

Good coaching & the right network of people behind you.

A bit of luck.

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When your young always playing with olders. e.g. 6 years old, playing for a under 9's team.

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Who you know

Luck

+ area you live in/your school

+ Ability

In that order...

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Ability, determination and most of all luck.

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people need to expand

area you live ?

school ?

who know ??

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The area you live, i.e the number of clubs scouting in your area, for example if you live in inner Essex (Romford etc) you have a very good chance, as there are so many clubs which recruit from that area.

Certain high schools have a network with clubs. Which kinda falls also into who you know and luck.

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Luck obviously plays its part, location, if you are spotted etc etc, and a CERTAIN degree of natural talent. I.e.if you are completely useless as a young man I doubt you will be able to make it

As with most things, the CHEIF element of success is

WORK

WORK

MORE WORK

You need to practice more than others do and be willing to do what others aren't. Work on your touch. Work on your touch. Work on your touch. Work on getting your head up. Work on your dribbling, awareness, vision

These things do not come naturally and if you don't have the oppertunity to be able to learn them as part of a youth system you have to find ways to do it yourself

get up at 5am in the morning and kick a ball against a wall until you have mastered your touch from every angle possible, these are the sort of things you need to do and it's no joke

Great footballers are great footballers because they practiced, whether it's Beckham staying for hours on end practicing freekicks or Ronaldinho juggling for hours with tennis balls

Go out, get trials, get into a team, if you fail, go to another one, give 100% every week and train every oppertunity you can, because in order to stand out above the rest you need to do what others aren't willing to do

The above applies whether you are 20 or 12

/

My source

Millwall academy

Sevenoaks Fc

Welling Reserves

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Luck occasionally has something to do with it (for example I played under a manager that was at Sevenoaks FC, he then moved to dagenham & redbridge) he asked me to come and train with the ressies

It's not worth asking why that didn't happen...but yes luck can get you places, but you need to have the dedication or all the luck in the world won't get you anywhere

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unless your an exceptional talent(even then you could get looked over)

persistence most kids get frustrated around 14/15

most the man who made it in this country wernt the best in there school, area or club

even guys like rooney...

but sticking at it could land you at a club

but as TF said school, locla club etc help

but lets face it

the easiest way is to be pally with the local coaches, give your son a white mans name and be involved as much as possible

they say football is a poor mans game but i disagree.... defo need to be rich working class to get in the door these days

/

disagree with everyone say work and practice (this alone will just mean your the best 5 a side player in your bits)

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Practise, Natural Talent, Luck and the right attitude/dedication. Had around 3 or 4 mates who were scouted by City and United at a young age but none of them made it past semi pro teams. Cousin also got scouted for United when he was 13-14 but his attitude was never there I don't think. He found the training boring, didn't like travelling their constantly as it was a struggle for his Mum to get him a lift there and he liked smoking weed. Funnily enough some crap team like Rochdale or something scouted him but then told him he was too small in height to be a Footballer so let him go, United picked him up straight after that.

All lived in Old Trafford and played for local clubs.

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disagree with everyone say work and practice (this alone will just mean your the best 5 a side player in your bits)

That's where the luck comes into it, you can't have one without the other and be successful, but you definitely need more hard work than luck

I think the difference between a lot of semi pro and pro ballers is years put in training and perfecting the craft

And the difference between guys who could have otherwise been semi pro ballers & sunday league is again, learning the craft

If you go to enoguh trials, meet enough managers in LLF and you have enough talent/dedicaiton it's definitely within reach

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i think there is very little luck to do with it

luck is kicking ball with your friends a scout from tottenham or wherever walks by with his dogs and asks you and your parents to come down for a trial you had no intention of going to

/ i do some local work with the yutes and the amount of kids who dont know how to play 11 a side is shocking(im not talking rules here) but they are so much better then kids that my bedrin goes scouting to watch for certain clubs in london... and the clubs will always take the boys that are ready to go straight into the academys all the time... even though they play less football weekly have a worse touch almost no technique... they just look and play the part and most importantly know the role they will be asked to do

i reckon most of them have no intention of being pros and when they are let go at 16 prob wont kick ball again

just that there parents put them through the proper channels at a younger age

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lol @ thinking luck dont play a part

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Who you know

Luck

+ area you live in/your school

+ Ability

In that order...

That's a big 1 still.

Also support from your parents is a necessity.

There are too many man that can barely kick a ball to be talking about ability.

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luck is kicking ball with your friends a scout from tottenham or wherever walks by with his dogs and asks you and your parents to come down for a trial you had no intention of going to

Minus the dogs and swap scout and Tottenham with Bill Kenwright and Everton and this is what happened years ago to someone I knew.

He was kicking ball in a pitch near his estate which is right next to Kenwright's office in West London and luckily Bill was walking by one day. He spoke to him and somehow blagged a trial.

But in the end he flopped the trial because from what I've seen of the way he plays he's a 'Flair - 20, Decisions - 2, Teamwork - 2' type of player.

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Manchester Utd Scout Offers Tips.

Article by Geoff Watson on "What do top scouts look for in a player?"

As Manchester United’s chief recruitment officer, Geoff Watson knows what he’s looking for in a potential star. Follow his tips on what makes a young player stand out and the next one he picks could be you……

TECHNIQUE

"The very first thing I look for in a football player is his first touch and close control. With some boys, their second touch is a tackle! Good players have their heads up, receive the ball and are looking to make the next pass straight away. It’s down to natural ability.

It’s great if a player has a few tricks up his sleeve, but it depends how he’s using them. I had Joe Cole playing for me a few years ago and he stood out a mile, but some players want to do three tricks before they even get the ball. By doing that they slow the game down, and allow the opposition defence to get back in position. I might see a kid doing keepy-uppies in the park, with all the tricks in the book, but I’d never invite him for a trial on the back of that. In that case, I’d ask the boy whether he played for a football club, and if he says “yes”, I’d arrange to go and have a look at him.

You can only judge a player by what he does on the football field, but it’s getting harder. With less football being played at schools, and a whole range of other distractions like computer games, there is a real shortage of naturally skilful players. A lot of the games I watch are much of a muchness. It’s a real bonus if a player stands out.

PACE

After technique the next most important thing is pace. Defenders, strikers and even goalkeepers need it – young players have to be athletes nowadays. When I’m on a scouting mission, I am specifically looking for a quick change of pace, a burst of speed that will beat a player, or change a game in an instant. I remember going to watch Jimmy Davis, our lad who tragically died last year while on loan to Watford. He was 11 years old and only about three foot tall, but he was so quick – just like Billy Whizz! I watched him take a corner and although he was small he effortlessly stroked the ball into the middle of the goal area and this was on a full-size pitch. He had pace and technique, and that’s all I needed to see.

Young boys can lose some of their pace as they grow, but often we’ll take a gamble –at that age, size and strength are less important. At Untied, we do tests to see how big a growing lad is going to be. Size is important, especially with goalkeepers

MOVEMENT

The next thing I look at is what a player does when he hasn’t got the ball. I’m looking for the boy with his head up, who’s moving into space to get the ball, making runs that give his team-mate options or draw his opponents out of position. I’m also looking for players who, when they’ve passed the ball, move quickly to get it back. If you look at players like Paul Scholes and Nicky Butt, from the moment they step onto the pitch they work hard. They never stand still.

On top of movement, there’s awareness. Some players instinctively know where to play the ball, and where their team-mates are or should be. I’m looking for the player who plays the first time pass without always taking a touch. That’s awareness. I’m also looking for the striker who doesn’t have to look up to find out where the goalie is, because his instincts tell him whether to chip or place it.

TEMPERAMENT

Now, if you’ve seen pace, technique and movement, the final piece of the jigsaw is temperament. Will they be able to handle playing in front of 75,000 people at Old Trafford? I’m looking for boys who are in control as well as ones who don’t mind getting wet and muddy! Ones who’ll be clattered and won’t make a meal of it if they aren’t injured. Ones who encourage their team-mates, and drive them on.

The ones that don’t work off the ball are difficult to consider. They might make a good pass, but they’ll think “that’ll do, that’s my bit done.” We call this ball watching, some players find it difficult to change this. I want to see a will to win and a desire. I like to see that Roy Keane look in a boy’s eyes. That’s a good indication he’s got the right attitude and a chance of making it. It’s not just about being good enough, you’ve got to have the hunger and desire to take away you all the way.

Temperament is tricky one for a scout. Ideally you don’t want a boy who loses it on the pitch, but plenty of temperamental players have made great footballers. If he’s got the ability, you have to go with your gut feeling – after all, he could be another Eric Cantona!

THE X-FACTOR

So, you might have sat through a thousand games before you find a boy who’s got all that, but the hard work is only the beginning. You don’t really know what you’ve got on your hands until you’ve brought him into the club for a trail and got him playing with boys of a similar standard. At United, we sign our first boys into the academy at nine, although we continue to scout all levels of football for the ones who may have slipped through the net. Scouting is not an exact science. You can never be sure whether a player will be good enough to play for United in a few years time, or that you’ve got a future Christiano Ronaldo or Paul Scholes on your hands. But when a player you spotted out on a freezing cold pitch in the middle of nowhere runs out of the Old Trafford tunnel in a United shirt, now that’s a great feeling. It makes all those hours of standing in the freezing cold worthwhile. That’s what gives the scout a real sense of achievement, something to be proud of."

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Also c/s the talk about schools and the area you live in being a factor.

I don't know if it still happens these days but coaches from QPR used to hold training sessions at primary schools and sport centres in my ends when I was younger.

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