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Don Crack

What's a lie you tell yourself everyday?

17 posts in this topic

"Ok I'll just snooze 5 more minutes and get ready quicker instead"

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Waking up after going bed late and telling myself, nah tonight I will go sleep early, next thing its 5 am and your awake again

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the usual. im going to eat better, stop smoking ,exercise ,pay outstanding bills and save for holiday..the usual nonsense

oh yeah and cut out booze

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Waking up after going bed late and telling myself, nah tonight I will go sleep early, next thing its 5 am and your awake again

why is this ???sooooo true im 29 plus and have been saying this shit since g.c.s.e year aged 15.(to revise)..why is it never possible to accomplish 

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Tonight I'll go to sleep on time.

doubt you will ,nobody ever does..but good luck with that challenge though

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not gonna order anymore takeaway this week

 

 

... orders takeaway the next day

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ill do the washing up tonight.. next day i really will do the washing up.. wife says u lazy c*nt ill do the washing up as u wank to much wen im at work

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I'm not gonna write this down, I'll remember it later

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If I buy this thing I'll be happy and won't buy anything else for awhile.

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it's an interesting subject

Social psychologists refer to cognitive dissonance as the presence of incongruent relations among cognitions (thought and understanding) that frequently results in excessive mental stress and discomfort.[1] Ultimately, individuals who hold two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas and/or values frequently experience cognitive dissonance. This stress and discomfort may also arise within an individual who holds a belief and performs a contradictory action or reaction.[2] For example, an individual is likely to experience dissonance if he or she is addicted to smoking cigarettes and continues to smoke despite believing it is unhealthy.[3]

Leon Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance focuses on how humans strive for internal consistency. When inconsistency (dissonance) is experienced, individuals largely become psychologically distressed. His basic hypotheses are listed below:

"The existence of dissonance, being psychologically uncomfortable, will motivate the person to try to reduce the dissonance and achieve consonance"

"When dissonance is present, in addition to trying to reduce it, the person will actively avoid situations and information which would likely increase the dissonance" [1]

Attitude ⟹ Belief Inconsistent with Attitude ⟹ Dissonance

A classic illustration of cognitive dissonance is expressed in the fable "The Fox and the Grapes" by Aesop (ca. 620–564 BCE). In the story, a fox sees some high-hanging grapes and wishes to eat them. When the fox is unable to think of a way to reach them, he decides that the grapes are probably not worth eating, with the justification the grapes probably are not ripe or that they are sour (hence the common phrase "sour grapes"). The Moral that accompanies the story is "Any fool can despise what he can not get". This example follows a pattern: one desires something, finds it unattainable, and reduces one's dissonance by criticizing it. Jon Elster calls this pattern "adaptive preference formation".[17]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

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it's an interesting subjectSocial psychologists refer to cognitive dissonance as the presence of incongruent relations among cognitions (thought and understanding) that frequently results in excessive mental stress and discomfort.[1] Ultimately, individuals who hold two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas and/or values frequently experience cognitive dissonance. This stress and discomfort may also arise within an individual who holds a belief and performs a contradictory action or reaction.[2] For example, an individual is likely to experience dissonance if he or she is addicted to smoking cigarettes and continues to smoke despite believing it is unhealthy.[3]Leon Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance focuses on how humans strive for internal consistency. When inconsistency (dissonance) is experienced, individuals largely become psychologically distressed. His basic hypotheses are listed below:"The existence of dissonance, being psychologically uncomfortable, will motivate the person to try to reduce the dissonance and achieve consonance""When dissonance is present, in addition to trying to reduce it, the person will actively avoid situations and information which would likely increase the dissonance" [1]Attitude ⟹ Belief Inconsistent with Attitude ⟹ DissonanceA classic illustration of cognitive dissonance is expressed in the fable "The Fox and the Grapes" by Aesop (ca. 620–564 BCE). In the story, a fox sees some high-hanging grapes and wishes to eat them. When the fox is unable to think of a way to reach them, he decides that the grapes are probably not worth eating, with the justification the grapes probably are not ripe or that they are sour (hence the common phrase "sour grapes"). The Moral that accompanies the story is "Any fool can despise what he can not get". This example follows a pattern: one desires something, finds it unattainable, and reduces one's dissonance by criticizing it. Jon Elster calls this pattern "adaptive preference formation".[17]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

So that's where "sour grapes" comes from.

Last paragraph is interesting.

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