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I.B.Blackman

I'm a Mad Genius

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.[
There is a common belief, although without empirical basis, that many famous historical figures gifted with creative talents have been affected by bipolar disorder.[1] Many of these have been retroactively "diagnosed" as suffering from bipolar disorder after their deaths based on letters, correspondence, contemporaneous accounts, or other material, most notably in Kay Redfield Jamison's book Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament.[3]. Touched With Fire presents the argument that bipolar disorder may be found in a disproportionate numbers of people with creative talent such as artists, comedians, musicians, authors, performers, poets, and scientists, and some credit the condition for their creativity.Several recent clinical studies have also suggested that there is a positive correlation between creativity and bipolar disorder, although it is unclear what the relationship is between the two.[4][5][6] Temperament may be an intervening variable.[5]A 2005 study at the Stanford University School of Medicine showed for the first time that a sample of children who either have or are at high risk for bipolar disorder score higher on a creativity index. Children with bipolar parents who were not bipolar themselves also scored higher.[7]
Genius' are always mad people.Kurt Cobain, Lisa Left Eye to an extent etc.I'm looking to join this club soon, go the madness just need the canvas.

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left eye???
burnt down yard etci need better examples tbh
I understand the "mad" part, but "genius"?

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC ideaology, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC idealogy, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
:D Heroin would have been closer.

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC ideaology, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
YOU WASTEMANROMANTIC WAS A FORM OF CLASSICAL MUSIC BASED ON ROMANTIC THEORIES IN THE 17SOMETHINGS

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the examples of Newton, Beethoven, d*ckens, and van Gogh all of whom suffered from mood disorders. And quotes Socrates who wrote centuries ago: “All extraordinary men distinguished in philosophy, politics, poetry and the arts are melancholic.”

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC idealogy, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
:D Heroin would have been closer.
Same effect, he was on both anyway.+ i was generally refering to the fact that he used drugs :D

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left eye???
burnt down yard etci need better examples tbh
most of the bait artists recognised as creative geniuses hav been f*cked in the head in some way or other tbhdrugs is a confounding factor

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC ideaology, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
YOU WASTEMANROMANTIC WAS A FORM OF CLASSICAL MUSIC BASED ON ROMANTIC THEORIES IN THE 17SOMETHINGS
Errrrrr, what the f*ck are you talking about?

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Guest The Member

RaiKkoNen failed on all levels with his postit shall be deleted from the records

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC ideaology, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
YOU WASTEMANROMANTIC WAS A FORM OF CLASSICAL MUSIC BASED ON ROMANTIC THEORIES IN THE 17SOMETHINGS
I hope you're joking. :D

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC idealogy, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
:D Heroin would have been closer.
Same effect, he was on both anyway.+ i was generally refering to the fact that he used drugs :D
There was no such thing as crack in the 18th Century, you idiot.And opium & crack have completely different effects.

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC idealogy, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
:D Heroin would have been closer.
Same effect, he was on both anyway.+ i was generally refering to the fact that he used drugs :D
There was no such thing as crack in the 18th Century, you idiot.And opium & crack have completely different effects.
So what, i got the drugs mixed up, why you getting a boner of it.If you want to be specific he was on OPIUM, not heroin or crack.Geez, calm yourself moron.

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC idealogy, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
:D Heroin would have been closer.
Same effect, he was on both anyway.+ i was generally refering to the fact that he used drugs :D
There was no such thing as crack in the 18th Century, you idiot.And opium & crack have completely different effects.
So what, i got the drugs mixed up, why you getting a boner of it.If you want to be specific he was on OPIUM, not heroin or crack.Geez, calm yourself moron.
That's what i said, opium.TBH you've just tied yourself in knots with your posts in this topic.You've confused yourself.My advice would be to leave the topic now, let it slide off the front page into the archive, and hope people just forget about it.

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Guest Smell Of Death

i really dont follow this topicwhat was the overall meaning of makin it?

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Mental illness and creativity are popularly considered to be related, particularly in the case of bipolar disorder. Although the association between bipolar disorder and creativity first appeared in the literature in the 1970s, the idea of a link between "madness" and "genius" is much older, dating back at least to the time of Aristotle, and reinforced by the views of the Romantic movement.
You know you lost when you have time to think on ROMANTIC idealogy, especially in times like these.Simon Taylor Coleridge, was a Romantic, a lyrical genius...what most people won't tell you is that the motherf*cker was on crack.Or should i say 'Opium'.
:D Heroin would have been closer.
Same effect, he was on both anyway.+ i was generally refering to the fact that he used drugs :D
There was no such thing as crack in the 18th Century, you idiot.And opium & crack have completely different effects.
So what, i got the drugs mixed up, why you getting a boner of it.If you want to be specific he was on OPIUM, not heroin or crack.Geez, calm yourself moron.
That's what i said, opium.TBH you've just tied yourself in knots with your posts in this topic.You've confused yourself.My advice would be to leave the topic now, let it slide off the front page into the archive, and hope people just forget about it.
Ermmm, didn't i already say i got the drugs mixed up anyway? Leave the topic because i got the drugs mixed up? LOL :D ass.

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