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zlastboss

FAO BLACK DUDES

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Black men 'prostate cancer risk' Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in UK men Black men living in England have a three times higher risk of prostate cancer than white men, figures show. They also tend to be diagnosed five years younger, a study of all cases in London and Bristol found. The results cannot be explained by access to diagnostic tests, awareness of the condition or screening, the British Journal of Cancer reported. Cancer charities said the finding may lead to better care for men at higher risk of the disease. Researchers at the University of Bristol said the US had already reported a higher rate of prostate cancer in black men. There's very few known risk factors for prostate cancer but it's starting to look like being of black race is a risk factor Dr Chris Metcalfe In the UK study, it was initially unclear whether there was a "genuinely" higher rate of prostate cancer in these groups or whether they were more likely to be diagnosed. But when they looked in detail at hospital records they found black and white men had similar levels of knowledge about prostate cancer, similar symptoms and similar delays before they went to their GP. However, there was some evidence that black men were more likely to have had a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test before they had any symptoms. Susceptibility On why black men could be being diagnosed earlier, the researchers said prostate cancer at a younger age was more likely to be due to greater biological susceptibility to the disease. The researchers are now doing further work to see if there are any differences in survival between the two groups. Studies looking at whether PSA should be used as a routine screening test are also being done and it may be that it is recommended for some high risk groups but not everyone. Study leader Dr Chris Metcalfe said this was the first evidence from the UK on differences between black and white men in rates of prostate cancer. "One of the possibilities based on anecdote was that black men may delay presentation - so the cancer gets to a later stage. "If anything the evidence showed black men were presenting sooner." He added: "There's very few known risk factors for prostate cancer but it's starting to look like being of black race is a risk factor." Dr Joanna Peak, science information officer at Cancer Research UK, said prostate cancer was the most common cancer in UK men. "The study indicates that there is a true biological difference between ethnic groups and this knowledge could potentially lead to improved care for men at higher risk of developing prostate cancer." Anna Jewell, from The Prostate Cancer Charity, said: "We would encourage all men to visit their GP if they are experiencing any possible symptoms of prostate cancer such as problems when urinating. "This strongly demonstrates the need for continuing work to raise awareness of the higher risk of prostate cancer in black men. "We would like to see further research investigating whether there are any differences in access to treatment or care for prostate cancer between black and white men to help us understand how we can meet the needs of those most at risk from the disease." http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7635946.stm

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I AM NOT A DUDEA DUDE IS SOMEONE WHO WORKS IN A RANCHNOW FIRST OF ALL YOU HAVE DISRESPECTED ME, MY SKIN AND MY DEPARTMENT
STOP CALLING ME, DUUUUUUUUUUUDEWHAT IS YOUR PROBLEM SON?

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Lol @ dudesAnyway lads, here is more info:How to check for prostate cancerby Dr Sarah Brewer What is the prostate?The prostrate is a walnut-sized gland below the bladder that produces the fluid that nourishes and protects sperm. Its position, wrapped round the urethra, means any growth can affect urinary flow. How to check for prostate cancerby Dr Sarah Brewer Because the main symptom is incontinence, prostate cancer tends to go undetected, which may help explain why it is still one of the main killers in men over the age of 45. Just under 35,000 new cases are diagnosed in the UK each year ? accounting for a quarter of all new male cancers. Difficulty urinating, more frequent urination and occasionally blood in the urine are important symptoms of the disease, but many men have no symptoms until the disease is advanced. What are the symptoms?A need to pass urine frequently, as well as having to wake up in the night to urinate, are common signs - although these symptoms are more often due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, a non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland. Other less common signs include pain when passing urine, blood in the urine, impotence and hip or lower back pain. Who is at risk?If your father or brother have had the disease, or if you're a meat eater, there is a higher chance of developing prostate cancer. How do I get tested?The prostate makes an enzyme called PSA (prostate specific antigen) which helps to thin male fluids so sperm can swim through more easily. As PSA is only produced in the prostate gland, it is a useful marker for detecting prostate cancer when measured in a simple blood test . A number of other factors can also raise the PSA level including, in some cases, having benign prostate enlargement. PSA does not diagnose whether or not prostate cancer is present, but does give an estimate of the risk that prostate cancer is present. If PSA is normal there is only a 2.5% chance that a man has prostate cancer. If it is moderately raised there is a 20% chance of prostate cancer If the blood level is very raised there is a greater than 50% chance that cancer of the prostate gland is present. It has been estimated that PSA testing plus examination by a doctor can increase the detection of prostate cancer by 32% over having an examination alone. When PSA levels rise by more than 20% per year, referral for prostate biopsy is usually recommended. There is currently much controversy over whether annual screening for prostate cancer is justified on the NHS in the UK, although it is available in other countries such as the US. Your doctor will usually arrange the test if it is clinically indicated. The blood test is also available privately for those who wish to pay for it

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Guest Flava Dave
There's very few known risk factors for prostate cancer but it's starting to look like being of black race is a risk factor
LMFAOexcuse me like i lol myself to death

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