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Doesn't have to be. Could just be a couple of modules. Eg. Login in. Edit repo details. Maybe create new repo. 

Simple as that. 

Reason why GitHub is good is because their API works really well and it's very easy to use. 

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20 hours ago, Mr. Martinez said:

Doesn't have to be. Could just be a couple of modules. Eg. Login in. Edit repo details. Maybe create new repo. 

Simple as that. 

Reason why GitHub is good is because their API works really well and it's very easy to use. 

hmm you're right

i need to stop looking at things like that as daunting as seeing whats out there i can use and the basic functionality needed

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On 15/04/2017 at 8:10 AM, dub said:

what does a sneaker bot do?

allows a user to buy x shoes when they are released in bulk there are a few floating about

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On 15/04/2017 at 11:37 AM, Mr. Martinez said:

@Funkyskanker You deploy it anywhere? Hook it up to a database?  

why don't you try to make a Twitter/GitHub/YouTube clone?

Could suggest you a bunch of stuff to try but it would be front end specific. 

For example, try to make a GitHub clone using react and redux. Work with the GitHub API and OAuth to login and carry out simple tasks.  Make it look nice using material design. Put it all together and optimise it using Webpack. Write tests for some of your components. 

 

 

didnt upload it anywhere just running it locally django uses sqllite

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I deployed mine to python anywhere

you learrrn a lot by usin github an deploying it. So much especially where things have gone wrong 

I've done 2 and skipped over steps an added bits from other tutorials then I've had to learn what my changes mean and how django actually works in order to fix things that wern workin according to the original tutorial 

 

has anyone used cloudfoundry?

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Yea that goes for pretty much everything in web development Smaddy. There's so much to learn and the best way is by trying shit out.

Heroku is a good place to practice deploying shit for free. 

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BTW, Anyone else reading this looking improve your javascript skills, here's some stuff that you should be exploring:

  • ES6
  • React (Other frameworks include - Vue.js & Angular)
  • Redux
  • Functional Programming
  • TypeScript
  • RxJs
  • Webpack 

 

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Just now, Mr. Martinez said:

BTW, Anyone else reading this looking improve your javascript skills, here's some stuff that you should be exploring:

  • ES6
  • React (Other frameworks include - Vue.js & Angular)
  • Redux
  • Functional Programming
  • TypeScript
  • RxJs
  • Webpack 

 

 

you work a javascript frontend dev?

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difficult question to answer 

d'you want to know specific stuff a front end dev does/doesn't do?

generally speaking, I work in a scrum team, with 2 week sprints. Every sprint we commit to a certain amount of work that we try to deliver. We have a daily stand up where we update each other (developers) about what we've been working on. ask people (developers, ba's, pm's) for help if needed.

I like to pair up as much as possible and work with other developers. Otherwise I fling my headphones on and get on with the task at hand.

 

 

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During my first month at my first job, I was lucky to be given free reign to learn. I spent most of that time on pluralsight.com and books, just trying to learn as much as possible. I was learning Javascript (literally the basics) and Angular at the same time, which was quite tough. 

I remember being super nervous before my first day. It happened really fast for me in that after constantly putting off, thinking I wasn't good enough to get a job, I finally decided to build a portfolio website (mostly padded out with fake work) and start applying. I built the site during a weekend and a couple of evenings. Then I remember spending Sunday applying for jobs. I had a couple interviews lined up by Tuesday, and by Wednesday I'd accepted an offer from the first company I spoke to. 

What I realised was that I'd basically wasted 2 years, talking myself out of applying for junior jobs out of fear I wasn't good enough. Imposter syndrome never really goes away, but if you TRULY know you want to head down this path, my advice would be to just go for it, rather than put it off until this or that.

 

 

 

 

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Thanks a lot. Good to hear

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On 17/04/2017 at 4:07 PM, Grafter said:

has anyone used cloudfoundry?

i do pretty much everything on IBM Bluemix which has a cloud foundry service as its easier to deploy things than setting up my own server and installing applications. i like it, much quicker and easier to get things going, can write something in pycharm push it to the git repo restart the service on CF and its right there, id like to understand it more though as i pretty much just know the basics based on what ive needed to do since ive been using it

been looking at OpenWhisk as well though, also on IBM Bluemix which is a serverless environment that works with APIs but Im having a real problem understanding much of it, but it works with various languages and you send messages through an API that trigger events so you can use python and trigger something in node which triggers something in javascript etc but thats as far as ive got with that

Docker is another thing im tryna understand but i think im tryna juggle too much, although this is what i understand most after python, so just gonna focus on python for a bit.

theres so much going on i dont even know where to look. im mainly going the robotics and IoT route rather than web development though

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i rate you lot that are striving to learn coding/programming.

shit gives me migraines just looking at it

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On 4/17/2017 at 4:59 PM, Mr. Martinez said:

BTW, Anyone else reading this looking improve your javascript skills, here's some stuff that you should be exploring:

  • ES6
  • React (Other frameworks include - Vue.js & Angular)
  • Redux
  • Functional Programming
  • TypeScript
  • RxJs
  • Webpack 

 

I think I got most of this stuff bagged or will have gone through all of this in a month or 2. I should be job ready alie? 

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Yea man, if you can put together a nice portfolio site, with examples of the projects you've created using some of the above technologies then you should be able to land yourself a junior role pretty quickly. 

Usually the way the process works at that level is that you're asked to complete a coding challenge. These can vary greatly between companies but for junior roles you're usually asked to create a simple app using the framework they're using (angular/react). Sometimes they want to see how good your JavaScript is, and will just ask you to build a component using vanilla JS. A bonus when you start to interview is that you start to practice even more as you get coding challenges come in. 

Once you start to get to face to face stage, make sure you can confidently work your way through 'front end interview questions and answers' lists. A popular one is:

https://github.com/h5bp/Front-end-Developer-Interview-Questions

If you struggle at any of these steps, don't be scared to get feedback from people on your coding challenges, interview techniques, whatever it may be. There's stackoverflow and code review for the former and meetups in London for the latter. 

Some people choose to go through this whole path by paying/getting sponsored to join a boot camp. That's also an option, and for some people it's the right one. I guess it's upto you to decide what you'd prefer to do. GeneralAssembly is one such boot camp. There's others too. 

Good luck!

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7 hours ago, Mr. Martinez said:

Yea man, if you can put together a nice portfolio site, with examples of the projects you've created using some of the above technologies then you should be able to land yourself a junior role pretty quickly. 

Usually the way the process works at that level is that you're asked to complete a coding challenge. These can vary greatly between companies but for junior roles you're usually asked to create a simple app using the framework they're using (angular/react). Sometimes they want to see how good your JavaScript is, and will just ask you to build a component using vanilla JS. A bonus when you start to interview is that you start to practice even more as you get coding challenges come in. 

Once you start to get to face to face stage, make sure you can confidently work your way through 'front end interview questions and answers' lists. A popular one is:

https://github.com/h5bp/Front-end-Developer-Interview-Questions

If you struggle at any of these steps, don't be scared to get feedback from people on your coding challenges, interview techniques, whatever it may be. There's stackoverflow and code review for the former and meetups in London for the latter. 

Some people choose to go through this whole path by paying/getting sponsored to join a boot camp. That's also an option, and for some people it's the right one. I guess it's upto you to decide what you'd prefer to do. GeneralAssembly is one such boot camp. There's others too. 

Good luck!

Calm looks like I'm nearly there then, thanks for this!

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Hows everyone gettin on?

I ordered a refurbished laptop because ive been using a toshiba click mini to do all this an its fallin over now

Got the refurbish laptop an have had to send it back

Anyone joined cloud foundry? It took them maybe a month to accept me

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